Accomplishments

Accomplishments
Victories for the Growing Accountable Development Movement

California Partnership’s founding members have won numerous agreements and policies to help low-income communities benefit from economic development. These victories, which mandate living wage jobs, affordable housing and other community benefits, include the following:

East Bay

Berkeley Living Wage Ordinance, 1999: City contractors and developers receiving subsidies over $100,000 for a project are required by this law to pay the living wage rate of $11.37 an hour.

Port of Oakland Project Labor Agreement, 2000: This agreement guarantees local hiring, money for job training and child care and the right to organize as part of a massive airport and seaport construction project.

Port of Oakland Living Wage Ballot Initiative, “Measure I”, 2002: Oakland voters overwhelmingly approved an EBASE initiative that extends the City of Oakland’s Living Wage rate of $9.45 with health benefits (or $10.87 without) to 1,500 low wage workers at Oakland’s Airport and Seaport.

Los Angeles

Los Angeles Worker Retention Ordinance, 1995: City contractors and developers receiving over $100,000 in subsidies for a project are required by this law to retain workers for 90 days if a contract changes hands. This ordinance impacts approximately 12,000 low-wage workers.

Los Angeles Living Wage Ordinance, 1997: City contractors and developers receiving over $100,000 in subsidies for a project are required by this law to pay the living wage rate of $9.52 an hour. This ordinance impacts approximately 12,000 low-wage workers.

Hollywood & Highland CBA, 1999: This agreement provides living wage jobs, job training and local hiring at this hotel and retail development project in the heart of Hollywood. Half of the 2,000 jobs at the development are either living wage or union, as a direct result of this intervention.

Los Angeles Responsible Contractor Ordinance, 2000: City contractors and developers receiving over $100,000 in subsidies for a project are required by this law to provide information on their past employment practices. This ordinance impacts approximately 12,000 low-wage workers.

North Hollywood Commons CBA, 2001: This agreement provides living wage jobs, employer neutrality to unionization (i.e. the “right to organize”) for retail workers, responsible contractor requirements, local hiring and funds for a day laborer and low-income childcare centers as part of a large subsidized ($31 million) retail, housing and office development in the San Fernando Valley. The project is expected to provide 2,000 permanent jobs, of which 75% will be living wage.

“Staples” Sports & Entertainment District CBA, 2001: This agreement guarantees living wage jobs, affordable housing, local hiring, responsible contractors, funds for parks and the right to organize as part of a massive subsidized ($70 million) entertainment, retail and housing project in downtown Los Angeles. The project is expected to employ 5,500 workers of which 70% will be living wage and 1,500 will be union, as a direct result of the Coalition’s work.

Santa Barbara Plaza CBA, 2002: This agreement guarantees living wage jobs, local hiring, responsible contractors and space for a community center as part of a subsidized ($35 million) retail and housing development in South Los Angeles. The project is expected to employ 2,000 of which 70% will be living wage.

Sunquest Industrial Park CBA, 2002: This agreement provides living wage jobs, responsible contractor requirements, local hiring, the right to organize for retail workers, a youth center and neighborhood improvements as part of a subsidized ($2.5 – 12 million) industrial development project in the San Fernando Valley. The project is expected to employ 500 workers of which at least 70% will be living wage.

San Jose

Tropicana Shopping Center Community Benefits Agreement: This agreement provides financial assistance for small and minority-owned businesses, and rent protections for residents as part of a retail development project.

Santa Clara County Living Wage Ordinance: County contractors and developers receiving subsidies over a certain amount are required to pay the living wage rate of $10 hour plus benefits.

San Jose Living Wage Ordinance, Worker Retention Ordinance and Labor Peace: Businesses with city service contracts over $25,000 and developers receiving subsidies over $100,000 are required to pay the living wage rate of $10.31 an hour with health care benefits ($11.56 without) and retain workers for 90 days if a contract changes hands. Over 3,500 workers also won employer guarantees of neutrality as a result of the Labor Peace provision, resulting in new union members.

CIM CBA: This agreement provides living wage jobs for service workers and large retail tenants, child care subsidies, subsidies for small businesses and guaranteed space in the new developments, in addition to higher levels and numbers of affordable housing units for a $140 million project in downtown San Jose.

Coyote Valley Inclusionary Zoning: In 2000, WPUSA applied the concept of the Community Benefit analysis to a 2,000 acre parcel of undeveloped land in South San Jose resulting in an inclusionary zoning ordinance of 25% for the entire parcel, producing an estimated 5,000 affordable units.

Coyote Valley Smart Growth Visioning Plan: Working Partnerships collaborated with a local environmental organization to design a smart growth plan for the area that meets community benefit standards, published in May, 2003.